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03/18/2009

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Wow. Great post. I think there is a lot of fear about having a startup move beyond the beginning stages and succeed. I've experienced this fear myself and allowed it to derail my big dreams. I'm at the startup stage again, and now that I recognize and undestand that fear, I have a plan in place to deal with it. Cross your fingers for me, OK?

I like your definition - "Entrepreneurship is about creating something a sufficient number of people want or need." It is so easy to think that "if you build it they will come" and not focus on producing what people want or need. Thank you.

Lesson Learned: Build a Startup and have a Great story to tell, but Build a Great Company and others will tell it.

Regards,
Michael

Very, very well said.

really poignant points, there is a lot of romanticism about the entrepreneur, when the folks that are often sited as great entreps are the ones that moved quickly passed being a startup and build amazingly profitable and meaningful companies.

Hi,

I have been self employed for a long time. I do things I enjoy and sometimes I get to eat the noodles.

Starting up is one set of skills but Keeping It Going (tm) is completely different.

I got bored when there was nothing to push against. So I foundered. Gradually I have been adapting to my bastard version of continuous improvement to keep things going and interesting for me.

Finally, making a startup and selling it to a bunch of dumb investors never appealed to me. Why would I waste my time on that? Getting rich is so much less important than doing things I care about.

My business loan will be paid off in three months. I like that the future is MINE after 5 years of hard work and painful (but worthwhile)personal growth.

Dan

The world would be a much better place if less people tried to build startups.
lessfewer people

It appears this blog breaks blockquote and strike tags in comments.

In the first line of this post, it should be "fewer people", not "less people". That's because "people" is plural rather than uncountable.

Spending other peoples' money in the vague hope to realize a kind of "exit" delivering a simple (financial) ROI has never been entrepreneurial.

It's still all about delivering a value, that customers want to pay for...


well said - start-up is a stage, not an end unto itself... if it doesn't evolve into something more (a great team that someone wants to hire, a reat product/service that can be rolled into another company or a stand-alone profitable company of whatever size) it can be a lot of things - a great learning experience, a badge of honor, a lot of fun, a stepping-stone or pre-cursor to something else great - but "success" it is not... no value has been created (at leats not by that activity alone) IMO.

Being in the middle of two startups, I really can't wait to have them become established, successful companies. There is very little glamor in a startup. Your points on getting your validation from the startup process are spot on.

It must be youth and naiveté that paints such a bleak picture of “startup” entrepreneurs. There are many definitions of, and ideas about, what makes an entrepreneur, but here is my favorite, because I think it says it all:

“An Entrepreneur is a person who organizes and operates a business, usually with considerable initiative, while taking on greater than normal financial risks in order to do so.”

In your post you do a great disservice to the 21.1 million businesses in the U.S. that do not have any employees. This entrepreneurial group comprises seventy percent (yes, 70%) of all U.S. businesses. These are the people who keep America running—even during a recession—and also pump $1 trillion dollars into the U.S. GDP every year.

Your description of startup entrepreneurs, and their ramen noodle-eating-sleepless life style is way off the mark. It may fit the dorm-room startup, and it does fit a good share of the 160 million employees in the U.S., but don’t paint solo entrepreneurs with the same brush you would paint failing businesses.

For every contented CEO of a growing company, there are many, many more contented…and wealthy…entrepreneurs without employees (“startups,” by your definition). As not all High School graduates want to go to Harvard—not all entrepreneurs want to grow a company…and we should be thankful for that.

Aside from your misguided attempt to denigrate startup entrepreneurs, I think Seth’s program is a wonderful idea, and I wish all of you much success in your endeavors.

Love this post. Very true.

Being in the middle of two startups, I really can't wait to have them become established, successful companies. There is very little glamor in a startup. Your points on getting your validation from the startup process are spot on.

In your post you do a great disservice to the 21.1 million businesses in the U.S. that do not have any employees. This entrepreneurial group comprises seventy percent (yes, 70%) of all U.S. businesses. These are the people who keep America running—even during a recession—and also pump $1 trillion dollars into the U.S. GDP every year.

well said - start-up is a stage, not an end unto itself... if it doesn't evolve into something more (a great team that someone wants to hire, a reat product/service that can be rolled into another company or a stand-alone profitable company of whatever size) it can be a lot of things - a great learning experience, a badge of honor, a lot of fun, a stepping-stone or pre-cursor to something else great - but "success" it is not... no value has been created (at leats not by that activity alone) IMO.

Love this post. Very true.

My business loan will be paid off in three months. I like that the future is MINE after 5 years of hard work and painful (but worthwhile)personal growth.

I got bored when there was nothing to push against. So I foundered. Gradually I have been adapting to my bastard version of continuous improvement to keep things going and interesting for me.

“An Entrepreneur is a person who organizes and operates a business, usually with considerable initiative, while taking on greater than normal financial risks in order to do so.”

Lesson Learned: Build a Startup and have a Great story to tell, but Build a Great Company and others will tell it.

This entrepreneurial group comprises seventy percent (yes, 70%) of all U.S. businesses. These are the people who keep America running—even during a recession—and also pump $1 trillion dollars into the U.S. GDP every year.

It may fit the dorm-room startup, and it does fit a good share of the 160 million employees in the U.S., but don’t paint solo entrepreneurs with the same brush you would paint failing businesses.

This is a very wonderful post. Thanks a bunch.

Thank you for posting this valuable information

The new year is already knocking at the door, let it will bring only happiness and joy.

Wow. Great post. I think there is a lot of

his is quite motivating and exclusive post , i have never read this type of piece of writing before.

You got a really useful blog I have been here reading for about an hour. I am a newbie and your success is very much an inspiration for me.

Good luck Converting . If you are expecting rrreepteneunship to become the next religion, it wont. And trust me, no one apart from the entrepreneur himself has the greatest benefit to make the leap. Take it or leave it. Really!And i didnt say that the transitioners should be sidelined, but eventually once the entrepreneur population rises, there can be events just for them or maybe there already is a good enough size and they just dont want to bump into too many wannabes. Quite possible.

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